The True Nature of Jesus’ Healing Miracles

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He said to her; Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering. – Mark 5:34

You can take any one of Jesus’ healing miracles, say, the woman suffering from an issue of blood, Mark 5:25-34, and the answer would still be the same. What seems to be something supernatural, Jesus explains as a simple matter of the faith that the healed one brought to the experience. We think that they are supernatural events, things that happen outside of the Natural Law as we understand it. But is that the case?

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In the words of theologian, Jurgen Moltmann, “Jesus’ healings are not supernatural miracles in a natural world. They are the only truly ‘natural’ things in a world that is unnatural, demonized and wounded.” Now there is a stunning thought. But for Christians, steeped in the faith that God “let go of divinity and became one of us, even unto death, death on the Cross,” (Phillipians 2:6-8) this is not such a strange idea.
G.K. Chesterton once wrote: “A child of seven is excited by being told that Tommy opened a door and saw a dragon. But a child of three is excited by being told that Tommy opened a door.” Chesterton, by the grace of God, never outgrew that child of three. What did Jesus tell us? “You must be more like little children to enter the Kingdom of God.” (Matthew 18:3) It is that quality of child-like innocense that hightens our faith and our ability to accept the ‘natural’ reality of miracles that seem to startle us in this broken, ‘unnatural’ world. They are flashes of the real world we are all meant to dwell in forever. The Belle of Amherst, Emily Dickinson, put it this way: “What happens when we are no longer capable of being startled? We’re dead, dead, dead.” Christians are alive with wonder. As they ought to be.

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Dan Doyle is a husband, father, grandfather, Vietnam veteran, and retired professor of Humanities at Seattle University. He taught 13 years at the high school level and 22 years at the university level. He spends his time now babysitting his granddaughter. He is a poet and a blogger as well. Dan holds an AA degree in English Literature, a BA in Comparative Literature, and an MA in Theology, and writes regularly for The Veterans Site blog.